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of the house homeland security committee, new york republican peter king. then where does america stand on the verge of a second obama term in office? the economy, the fiscal cliff talks, the president's priorities in the next four years. our roundtable is here. david brooks of "the new york times." msnbc's reverend al sharpton. former ceo of hewlett-packard carly fiorina >> historian and film maker ken burns. and nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. and we'll here from representative gregory meeks this morning as we check in on some of the hardest-hit victims of hurricane sandy and see how they offered thanks this weekend while surrounded by destruction. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." with david gregory. >>> president obama doing his part for the economy over the weekend out holiday shopping as part of small business saturday, picking up several children's book at an independent bookstore iypÑarlington. >>> meanwhile, uncertainty in the middle east. more clashes in egypt over the weekend as
a good holiday. >>> i want to turn to the republican side. peter king of new york. congressman, hope you had a good holiday. good to see you this morning. >> i had a great holiday, especially because notre dame beat southern cal. >> my poor step dad. he is not so happy this morning. >> i don't care about him. >> let me continue on the issue of taxes because this is important. and as i say, it's going to be the defining issue. you hear republican saxby chambliss say it's not going to govern what i do. norquist saying he promised the people of georgia that he would reform the government rather than raise taxes. where do you stand on the pledge? can this be overcome? with revenues be raised? >> first of all, i agree with chambliss. a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago, is for that congress. for instance, if i were in congress in 1941, i would have signed the declaration of war against japan. i'm not going to attack japan today. the world has changed. the economic situation is different. ronald reagan and tip o'neill realized that in the 1980s. i think everything should be on the t
and bob corker in the senate and peter king in the house, they haven't said overall now we changed our tune, we're in favor of raising taxes, what they said is okay, maybe we will budge on tax increases of some form in exchange for some cuts to entitlements and things like that. so that's clearly a major difference in their stance. there is going to be a lot of tough negotiating that goes on here. no question about it. but the thing that has changed is the republicans are beginning to signal they will accept tax increases as part of some kind of deal to solve this fiscal cliff problem and start dealing with the $16 trillion debt. >> so you brought up some of the names. where do you seat republican party right now? are they beginning to line up behind the bob corkers and the saxby chambliss and lindsey graham willing to talk about new taxes on the wealthy, or is the party still, like, say, rand paul, i talked to him a short time ago. take a listen. >> -- willing to raise taxes when we're still spending $300,000 a year on robotic squirrels to watch rattlesnakes attack a robotic squirrel
was an extreme position. >> so lawmakers, we're talking about peter king, lindsey graham being the latest ones today, to say they might consider abandoning that no tax hike pledge, similar to how senator saxby chambliss said he would abandon the pledge for the american people. yes, they may have been extreme positions but for a long time most of these lawmakers didn't feel it was extreme, they felt it was the necessary thing to do, they were digging in heels for a very long time. so it does seem hike an incredible page that's being turned here to be able to now say, i'll consider abandoning that. it does seem like there is maybe an olive branch that's being extended? >> i think turning back to a reasonable position is not the same as saying that i'm being moderate. what we are seeing in our polit politics, not just taking a couple of senators and using them as data points, but looking at the larger data sets of the trends over time, we're seeing moderates in general being chased out of our politicians. we have fewer blue dogs. we keep seeing moderate republicans be primaried when they are up f
we cut spending, we didn't raise taxes. so other republicans did not listen to peter king or these others. >> and this guy is a political lone shark. the majority of americans want to see tax rates go up on the rich but will norquist convince enough republicans it's better to dig in their heels than to reach a compromise? tom coburn is the republican senator from oklahoma and joe klein is a columnist for "time." senator, i don't want to abuse your presence. my children think you're the greatest. i have a couple kids, one who worked on the debt commission and another one who just loves you for some reason. let's find out why. it seems to me if you look at the numbers, just arithmetic here, right now the government is taking in 15.7% of the gdp in the current fiscal year and spending 22.9% of the gdp. common sense tells us if we're going to get to 20, it seems like getting maybe to 20 maybe some liberals want to bid more, conservatives want to bid less. you have to come in both directions. your thoughts? >> i agree. the problem, chris, is we haven't had long-term thinkers in
? lindsey graham, saxby chambliss, bob corker and peter king, and mike lee, they've all said they're willing to compromise and consider revenue increases to avoid the fiscal cliff. their shift in position has grover norquist vowing to help unseat any republican who breaks his taxpayer protection pledge. the question tonight is whether this is a larger trend or whether republicans are just testing the waters and two men who know about testing the waters, politicking and actually meaning what you say join me now. david frum and james carville, you have been on every side of this. let me start with you though david. republicans talking about raising revenue by closing loopholes. as opposes to raising tax rates. you can get a heck of a lot of revenue that way. is this smart for them r or not? >> republicans are going to be yielding ground, but they have to avoid seemingly yielding ground underressure. president has a strong hand. they have to keep their party together. frankly, i think loopholes are the wrong place to -- so-called loop homes, meaning deductions for home mortgage, are the wrong p
cantor, saxby chambliss, peter king, lindsey graham and bob corker all saying to some degree or another that they would be willing to step back from it. certainly encouraging, but as you saw in that piece from a while ago from athena, there is still some distance between both sides as the clock winds down. >> and, dan, folks who came from those meetings with the president last week and they say that he in those meetings spoke very generally about the possibility of reforming these entitlement programs, big programs like medicare, medicaid, that type of thing, is the white house willing to put on the table specifics regarding the kinds of reforms in those big, big entitlement programs? >> if so, this is something that is happening behind closed dooshz, and they're not saying so publically. republicans have been looking at the health care reform law since the election time now, during the campaign to try to roll it back, to have it repealed. many attempts there. they were hoping that if they had won the election, that they could have also repealed it then, and now, of course, the presiden
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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